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Ypsilanti artist

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UpsideDownTown

Last Friday was our first venture into art experiences rather than exhibits. While showing regional work for retail sale was important, it didn't feel fulfilling as a community contribution. When Nick started talking about doing a camera obscura a while back, we though it was the perfect opportunity to show our visitors that programming can be affordable, but highly enriching. 

We had two waves of people come through with free tickets, ready to experience the inside of the camera obscura, which translates to "dark room". If you make a box or in this case, a room, completely dark and only let in a pinhole of light, light fills the space with the exterior image, inverse and upside down. I still can't explain the physics of it but this is what happens inside our eyes, inside a camera, inside a pinhole camera. It's really quite extraordinary. 

The first experience yielded fairly good representation of the street and particularly the farmers' market building across the way. We learned that late morning light gave us the best image in terms of sharpness and vibrancy but people were in awe all the same. The second wave was not as strong as this time, the sun had moved lower in the sky (around 6:30 pm) and we were getting less of an image. But when people and cars went by, it was quite thrilling. And although we were the ones in the "box", it felt quite voyeuristic as people didn't know we were seeing them. Upside down. 

Here's a short visual story on the process. We want to thank everyone that took the time to come out and get locked in the studio with us. It was a wonderful learning and social experiment. Lots more to come! 

CameraObscura002.jpg
CameraObscura005.jpg

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In the Studio with Jessica Tenbusch

Last week I got to visit our September artist, Jessica Tenbusch in the studio while she prepped some of her luxurious objects for our show. I first discovered her work during a post for DIYpsi and was taken with how beautifully organic her pieces are, as if they sprung from nature themselves. 

Much of her work is derived from animal parts but she only uses objects that have been found deceased or gifted by friends and family. Jessica is a master of melding materials and creating surfaces that are at once awe-inspiring and slightly macabre. In her "menagerie" that day, I got to see skulls of deer, coyote, raccoon, possum, a few teeth, casts of cicadas, and other various insects. 

I was in awe of the myriad of hammers and supplies in general that Jessica uses for her metal, plaster, woodworking practices. She is truly a jack of all trades. 

Measuring her wood slabs to be cut in the wood shop.

Measuring her wood slabs to be cut in the wood shop.

A frog suspended in layers of resin and encased in metal. To the right, a fitted wooden palette which will house the piece.

A frog suspended in layers of resin and encased in metal. To the right, a fitted wooden palette which will house the piece.

From conceiving the idea on paper to creating the real thing, this piece   includes such materials as   resin, wood, cicadas, cast bronze and various metals  .

From conceiving the idea on paper to creating the real thing, this piece includes such materials as resin, wood, cicadas, cast bronze and various metals.

Check out Jessica's intricate jewelry for purchase at her Etsy store, equilibria. And save the date September 4th, 2015 for her opening party with her exhibit running the entirety of the month, September 1-30, 2015.  We can't wait to unveil the exceptional craftsmanship and splendor of her work. More to come!

 

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